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20130216
20130224
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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
defend today has been common to religions across time in many cultures and so we was don't want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating theology is rather than the other way round and it's not an argument from tradition. i'm not arguing because it's been this way it always should be. another thing is my argument can't be answered by appeals to the quality. we usually think that is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict the pool of people eligible to marry. it is true about fake marriage is a good income should be available on an equal basis and you get right to same-sex marriage from there. i think this debate is about a prior question. it's a debate about what marriage is and why the state is involved in the first place, which of course has implication for which unions get recognized as marriages. my proposal is the main mission of marriage and support for same-sex marriage is mistaken and a strong about what marriage is. another is he can't explain much less controversial features that we all agree tha
of fellow muslims. are they killing us, she cries? we share the same religion, what did we do? why have the culprits not been punished? those responsible for this devastation were suny extremists. was their second major attack in the past six weeks. is now undermunity siege, calling out for protection and for justice. she'll leaders claimed the killers who were nurtured by the top -- she'll leaders claimed the killers still have powerful friends. -- shia leaders claimed the killer is still have powerful friends. we believe there are some elements in our law enforcement who were supporting them, who are protecting them. >> as the latest victims were laid to rest, the government finally took some action. suspects were rounded up and a few senior militants were killed. shias wonder why it took so long and how many more bodies they will have to bury. "bbc worldwatching is america." --tro's mention of the world word retire has people talking. celebrated piece of work by the british street artist is now on the other side of the world. we report on the controversy that it has sparked. >> it is
the church. >> it is drowning out the voice of religion. >> cardinal worrl thinks it is unlikely the next pope will be an american. >>> a look at this morning's health news. there are two studies out in the journal journal of pediatrics. they give parents some guidance on what kids should watch on tv. one found kids who watch tv excessively are more likely to exhibit antisocial and even criminal behavior in early adulthood. it increased 30% with every hour children watch tv. children should watch no more of two hours of quality programming each day. the second study showed aggressive content leads to aggressive children. the kids in the study were three to five years old. they all watched the same amount of television. the only change was the type of programming. the children who watched the better quality, educational programming were significantly less aggressive than the other group. >>> when we hear all the talks about federal cuts and sequestration there are a few of us preparing for furlough and his cutbacks and another group of us think it has nothing to do with them. coming up at
not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people eligible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equal basis. i think that this debate is actually
much that can be laid at the pope's feet? >> the purpose of a religion is to help people make sense of the big questions, the questions that none of us have answers to. why are we here, where are we going, why do we suffer, what happens after death. it's important a church or any religion engage with its people and meet them where they are. it's to help people find meaning. when a religion stops helping people find meaning people will turn to consumerism, to culture, and the pope is so busy declaring our culture, the culture of death, you know, putting the responsibility on us. >> you are laying this on the pope's feet. you're saying this person that comes out of cdf and the person who was the chief theologian is alienating the flock in the u.s. and europe where church membership as decline. >> he and the hierarchy of a. they have denied the crisis in the priesthood. >> i think it's doctrinal declarations are beautiful. they are out of time. it's precisely the crisis we haven't addressed. i was with some priests at dinner the other night teaching at a catholic university, living in
good crowd. they had a tensile store. here is the store that really blew my mind, true religion. my son wanted a pair of jeans. i said okay. i thought they would cause me a little less than $100. over $200. i was very shocked at how crowded the store was. he tried on four or five pairs of pants. he never tries any on. i am not sure what is going on. something has changed. remember late last year, true religion consider putting themselves up for sale. i think what it is, current management. this stock may be oversold here. they have one by on it. last year they were nothing but downgrades. earlier this year, insiders starting to nibble at the stock. extraordinarily conservative, in my opinion. they also upped their dividend. they opted to the fourth quarter of last year. showing signs of confidence. true religion, my son took me and he got me. i said from now on, the rest of my year, my man, nothing over $45. tracy: are you still thinking it is a by target pressure marks. charles: they announced to hire some advisors. it jumped 25%. again, my gut tells me these are the guys caught you kn
the religion to be in crisis. here is cbs news correspondent allen pizzey reporting from rome. >> reporter: with his brief announcement in latin, benedict set a modern peres sent that ensures his successor cans take the same path. as one cardinal put it-- he broke a taboo. catholics around the world reacted with surprise, some sadness but overall there was a sense that benedict had done the right thing for himself and the church. >> it's quite an act of humility for the pope to realize he can no longer physically and mentally discharge the duties of his author. >> even as benedict's legacy is being debated, the struggle for succession has begun behind the scenes. latin americans feel their time has come and there are several strong candidates, including cardinal leonardo sandri of argentina. the region is home to 42% of the world's catholics and the church needs a bulwark against gains made by evangelical christians. africa has the fastest-growing catholic population. ghanaian cardinal peter turkson, who's only 64, tops many lists to be the first black pope. the strongest european candidat
viewing homosexuality as a sin. >> it's been said that politics and religion should never be discussed in polite conversation. but the united methodist church is doing just that -- discussing whether to change church doctrine added in 1972 that declares homosexuality incompatible with christianity.
that politics and religion should never be discussed in polite conversation. but the united methodist church is doing just that -- discussing whether to change church doctrine added in 1972 that declares homosexuality incompatible with christianity.
more powerfully than its religion, and the african american inner city is strong and growing strong under jim crow. monday night at 10:00 on mpt. >> catch a free look at upcoming programs and events and find it online. >> programs on
of that is that i am not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people elible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equa basis. i think that this debate
religions, actual religions and i think that, look, there's ways that people can take days off for their special days. i think though that you're going to be looked at funny if you insist you need halloween off. i think it's insulting if you're a wiccan or a pagans and if you're an atheist or a pagans, if you're celebrating nature, an everyday experience. >> tucker: only a country too rich too long could be this frivolous and silly. the statements from the school, the information about the wiccan and pagans holidays, the statement says, has been in the guide since last fall. keep in mind this is not intended just for faculty, this is an informational guide for anyone across campus. letting you know. >> letting you know which days you can take. >> tucker: and christianity and comes down to-- >> i think that there's a rejection of tradition. i think this is again, not about elevating anyone else, it's about paganses and wiccans used for a political agenda to downgrade what's important to a majority of americans. i think that this is an anti-tradition action. i think paganses and
. >> reporter: and he repackages religion in a very unusual way. he's also a professional rapper, and preaches religion with rhyme. >> sometimes you have to do a little hip-hop, too. >> reporter: during a sermon? >> if need be. ♪ i'm trying to live it like christ ♪ >> reporter: as a rapper around the chicago area, the reverend is known as jay quest. >> what it really does is hopefully lead people into a greater understanding and awareness of themselves and their god. >> reporter: he's been preaching for ten years, he's been rapping professionally for about five years. they don't seem like they go together. but apparently they do. >> i don't think that i rap religion, though. i think that i rap about life, and i rap about the narratives of all of our experiences. i think that's the same thing that sermons are about. >> reporter: sermons and rap, the two have met. frank mathy, abc 7 news. >> whatever it takes. >> whatever gets the message out there is a good thing. so different people respond to different things. i like it. >> especially if you want to get to the younger demographic. that's
was also interested in spreading religion and stuff, primarily it was about spices. why were spice is so valuable that it? well, it wasn't just that food was terrible in europe at the time. and it was. but each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. it might make you feel a bit more brandy, passionate but this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day. all right? so that is one of the reasons why this became so valuable. so after the conquest and colonization, the fed made a fortune exporting drugs back to europe. i drugs i mean sugar and many people consider a drug, it's where we get rum from. definitely drug, coffee, tobacco, and of course aphrodisiacs spices. so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. think about where we are today, washington dc, virginia, maryland, these were all drugs back in that time. a lot of these drugs were introduced back to europe and people look at them with revulsion. tobacco, why would you put fire and smoke into your mouth. coffee was a death penalty offense in many states for many re
by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. but it's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's what you were taught. i'm 24, and i know that's not the case anymore. but really, i mean, we always do that. we as humans are so fast to judge one another without really getting to know one another for what they are. so i definitely think it's something we could all take, take to and listen to. so anyways, we were stationed in northeastern afghanistan in a place called as jr. man, it's in the kunar province right on the pakistan border. and this is where i would be stationed with lieutenant john sovereign, gunnier is cent -- expubl and doc leighton. doc leighton was a navy corpsman, but they might as well be marines, so i'm going to cull him a -- call him a marine from here on out. [applause] so part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and getting to develop our team. becau
and spreading the religion and stuff, but primarily he was about spices. why spices? why were spices so valuable back then? it wasn't just that food was finish in europe at the time -- food was terrible in europe at the time before all these things in the new world, and it was, but all these spices, each new, exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. they might make you feel a bit more randy, how should i put this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day, right? so that's one of the reasons why this trade became so valuable, and people risked their lives to explore these things. so after the conquest and kohl in iization, the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs back to europe and consuming them within this hemisphere as well. and by drugs i mean sugar -- which many people consider a drug -- where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, tea, and, of course, these afrotease yak spices, right? and so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. right? vast fortunes were created. think about, you know, where we are today, wa
study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. -- flora, fauna, philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among t
fellow religion, i want our people out of there. that is not right. i come over to our country and try to kill us. we need to stay over there and fight for our freedom. host: you bring up interesting points. basic idea we have in this country is that we get into wars, but we very rapidly lose the ability to support those wars, political perspective. we saw what happened in vietnam. if desert storm last longer, we would have seen the same thing there. we know what happened with iraqi freedom. you're looking at a nation that can go in, with a superb military capability, which her daughter is a part of, and it can make a lot of differences, but the problem you have is that you have a political situation where we cannot sustain a long- term deployment, 12-13 years in afghanistan over the long term. it has become america's longest war. economically, you look at how that works. the big problem that i have with the drawdown is perhaps related to what your saying -- you have to be very careful about what to tell the enemy. you have to have a negotiating position that gets you from the strength
we are trying to go curious to me by a freelance religion writer and one thing i've noticed in doing a lot of the reporting is what i call the equivalencies where they will put out usually someone from the right based on the fact they are a colorful character interesting without any examination whatsoever of the claims and the funding streams and the data cited and so forth and as presenting an article on youtube is a photograph and a video clip of someone saying something that is inaccurate that is unchallenged and i wonder moving forward what you intend the thoughts on that. >> i think it plays into what i was saying earlier having the assessments in the journalism and not just saying she said this and she said that that actually saying this is what they both said and here's another data points and what should actually be the case. >> - dylan and i mustered into the college. i have a question on the digital landscape. clearly today we've got about connecting in meaningful ways. i'm a composer here at harvard and i'm curious if any point along when you thought about creating for col
could basically only study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among the few
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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